Recent Posts

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Working / Re: WARNING this vid shows a bird being retrieved
« Last post by sodpot2000 on Today at 01:36:52 PM »
She really goes like the wind doesn't she?
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Health / Re: Queen Annes Legs in Cockers
« Last post by Aimeetess on Yesterday at 12:45:04 PM »
Thanks Jeff,

I won't be breeding from him unless it straightens out, like the vet thinks it will but I'm not so sure.


A x
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Health / Re: Cruciate ligament in 4 month puppy
« Last post by Ben's mum on November 21, 2017, 04:30:44 PM »
Both mine had cruciate ligament injuries. 
Ben's was quite nasty and needed crate rest for 4 weeks then several weeks building up to full fitness again.  He was fine once fully fit and continued to do agility for many years and was very very fast and agile  :luv:.  The only time we ever saw any reoccurrence was if we went on holiday and he was running on sand, for some reason this would cause stiffness in that back leg so we had to limit what he did on a beach.   Right up to old age he remained physically fit and had no lasting problems with it.

Harry came at 8 mths to us with some damage to his cruciate ligament and his does bother him if he does too much we have to be careful.  We could not risk agility with him, but for normal running on grass he is ok.  Uneven surfaces if they are very bumpy like on the moors he does find tricky and will lift his leg occasionally and going down stairs at speed he will sometimes lift his leg and go down on three legs, but not sure if this is habit or because it twinges?

Glad to hear Harley is doing well looking forward to hearing how his training goes
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Health / Re: Queen Annes Legs in Cockers
« Last post by JeffD on November 21, 2017, 03:58:39 PM »
not uncommon in cockers some field trial champs have had qal's lots of dogs go through life without any problems if not severe,  best not to breed from them though
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Behaviour & Training / Re: Quick question regarding barking
« Last post by bmthmark on November 21, 2017, 03:40:59 PM »
Just a quick update.

I can tell when Jett is going to go crazy at the door, he is very eager to get out. So I put him on his lead, he then pulls me round the garden sniffing like crazy. But no barking at all  :D.
After I think he calms down, I get him off the lead. He is fine, until a bird fly's over the garden. This gets him back in to crazy mode and he runs around barking, jumping on anything and literally uncontrollable.

Its weird because he is not like this when we are out (which i'm pleased about), its just in his own garden.

He doesn't seem in a scared state or a worried state, he seems like he just doesn't like other animals going in his garden.
Its worst in the morning as well, but I think this is because more wildlife seems to be around then.


Its not a major thing but I would like to stop this early on whilst he is young. Any idea's what I can do?
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Working / Re: eze on the peg (no shooting, no birds on this vid)
« Last post by ips on November 21, 2017, 03:27:34 PM »
Thank you, I appreciate the explanation, it makes the videos more enjoyable when you understand the role of the dog and the goals that are set for them. Eze is very impressive, you both work well together.

Your very kind 😉
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Working / Re: eze on the peg (no shooting, no birds on this vid)
« Last post by ejp on November 21, 2017, 03:10:12 PM »
Thank you, I appreciate the explanation, it makes the videos more enjoyable when you understand the role of the dog and the goals that are set for them. Eze is very impressive, you both work well together.
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Oldies (Over 9s) / Re: Warts
« Last post by bizzylizzy on November 21, 2017, 02:51:22 PM »
Homeopathy is not a "natural remedy" it is pure mumbo jumbo. If you don't believe that, I have some lovely homeopathic vodka for sale at £40 a bottle.

You‘re quite entitled to your opinion but please don‘t be disparaging of those of others, especially if they‘ve based them on experience and research of the subject. Homeopathic  treatments are by the way, very much cheaper than conventional ones so your comparison to a 40 pound bottle of Vodka is misplaced!
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Working / Re: eze on the peg (no shooting, no birds on this vid)
« Last post by ips on November 21, 2017, 02:31:30 PM »
Thank you ejp 👍

I appreciate that not everyone wants to see shooting or dead birds etc so I respect that by making it clear if it is likely to offend or safe to watch.

On a driven day teams of "guns" (the name given to a shooter on a driven day...a gun, the guns for instance) is usually 8 (sometimes less occasionally 10 but the usual is 8) draw numbers which determines which "peg" you are on for the first drive you then usually move up 2. So if you draw peg 4 you will shoot each drive as follows 4-6-8-2-4 the white marker as seen on the clip is the pre determined (by the keeper and or shoot captain) spot for that peg. Guns are "pegged out" approx thirty yards or more apart. Birds are then driven over the line of guns. Low birds are left to fly on as easy shots are considered un sporting and anyone who shoots un sporting birds will not be popular either with the other guns or the keeper. The rule of thumb is , if its unmissable you leave it, if its very high or difficult for your shooting ability you leave it as nobody wants injured birds. Injured or "pricked" (as we call them ) birds but it is an unfortunate occurrence and for that reason "picker ups" handlers with retrieving dogs stand well behind the gun line and send dogs to retrieve "pricked birds" on retrieval these birds are humanely despatched by the handler.

That is a quick idea of how a driven day is run. These days are steeped in tradition and etiquette including dress. I could write pages and pages but tha gives an idea.

Anyway, your question. A guns dog sits at peg (if it will sit without being restrained by a lead it is referred to as "a none slip retriever") and must remain steady to gunshot and to birds falling to the ground, the dog must not "run in" for these birds until after the drive and then will be commanded to retrieve (I use "get out") it is worth mentioning at this point that formal driven days have picker ups to carry out this task but smaller syndicate shoots such as my vid, at least some guns must have a "peg dog"

So, owners of WCS have taken on dogs that have been selectively bred over many many generations to do two things 1- to hunt for prey 2- to retrieve shot prey. The next time pooch brings your slippers or digs up your flower bed remember that it isn't being naughty it is instinctively doing what it was bred for 😁

I hope that gives you an idea of how things work, feel free to ask any questions.
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Working / Re: eze on the peg (no shooting, no birds on this vid)
« Last post by ejp on November 21, 2017, 01:50:22 PM »
That is a lot of self control. When you say 'on the peg' I take it that means waiting until a bird has been brought down, do you then release on command?
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