Author Topic: Resource aggression in puppies  (Read 742 times)

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Online lescef

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Re: Resource aggression in puppies
« Reply #30 on: May 19, 2017, 12:49:32 PM »

You dog sounds no more difficult than mine has been.  As a pup I'd have used thick gloves to do this and been rewarded with a bite most likely.

I was trying to resist commenting, but couldn't sorry  :-\ I just don't think this is very helpful for someone who is clearly upset and struggling, each situation is different, and we don't know if Teddy is more or less 'difficult' than your dog as the environment and situation is going to be different.  All we can do is share our stories and experiences and offer support to each other.  Wearing gloves and accepting being bitten is just nonsense and not a constructive way to resolve the situation at all.  I don't want to go off topic and get into an argument, but do feel its more important we offer support while the OP comes to a decision about what they do next.

Yes. I don't usually get involved in personal opinions but I do feel the situation is causing much anxiety to the OP especially with children involved making life very unpredictable.  Each case is very different. X
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Offline Mudmagnets

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Re: Resource aggression in puppies
« Reply #31 on: May 19, 2017, 01:19:58 PM »

You dog sounds no more difficult than mine has been.  As a pup I'd have used thick gloves to do this and been rewarded with a bite most likely.

I was trying to resist commenting, but couldn't sorry  :-\ I just don't think this is very helpful for someone who is clearly upset and struggling, each situation is different, and we don't know if Teddy is more or less 'difficult' than your dog as the environment and situation is going to be different.  All we can do is share our stories and experiences and offer support to each other.  Wearing gloves and accepting being bitten is just nonsense and not a constructive way to resolve the situation at all.  I don't want to go off topic and get into an argument, but do feel its more important we offer support while the OP comes to a decision about what they do next.

Yes. I don't usually get involved in personal opinions but I do feel the situation is causing much anxiety to the OP especially with children involved making life very unpredictable.  Each case is very different. X

Would agree with all the supportive comments made on the post, I also feel it is not 'Giving Up' when you come to the decision that you have done all you can and you are doing what you feel is best in your particular circumstances.
Remembering Smudge 23/11/2006 - 3/8/2013 now at the Bridge.


Offline assumpta

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Re: Resource aggression in puppies
« Reply #32 on: May 19, 2017, 03:33:16 PM »
I too want to add my support for the difficult decision you know you have to make. Teddy sounds like a lovable little chap and will be more than happy I would think in an adult only home. Noone can live their lives in constant anxiety and worry wondering what may or could happen next. It's one thing having children visiting and putting the dog safely away but with small kids in the house and their friends visiting it would be constant worry. Thinking on you and be kind to yourself as you're doing the right thing for Teddy and your family ...



Offline ejp

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Re: Resource aggression in puppies
« Reply #33 on: May 19, 2017, 03:39:20 PM »
I am so sorry you find yourself in this situation. Again, please can I reiterate the use of a breed specific rescue, it is very important as you know yourself these are quite unique wee dogs. If it helps to put your mind at ease we have a rescue cocker, who came with lots of issues, and needed to be an only dog in a quiet home. We have made adjustments to how we work on a daily basis to accommodate her needs. So please, take heart that there are people who will help you with right choice for Teddy, whether that is with you, or in a new home. You obviously care deeply for this wee one and it is a horrible situation to be in.

Offline bizzylizzy

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Re: Resource aggression in puppies
« Reply #34 on: May 19, 2017, 04:01:21 PM »
I too want to add my support for the difficult decision you know you have to make. Teddy sounds like a lovable little chap and will be more than happy I would think in an adult only home. Noone can live their lives in constant anxiety and worry wondering what may or could happen next. It's one thing having children visiting and putting the dog safely away but with small kids in the house and their friends visiting it would be constant worry. Thinking on you and be kind to yourself as you're doing the right thing for Teddy and your family ...




Those are my sentiments too and I can  think of nothing else constructive to say that hasn't been said already. Teddy sounds a lovely little boy and he's still young enough to adjust to a new family and develop his good sides without his guarding issues standing in the way. It is hard and I feel desperately sorry for you but at the end of the day your children have to take priority, You've done everything you could but sometimes there are things you just can't control and its better to give him the chance of a good life now than have to be faced with an even harder decision later if something happens. Be kind to yourself and above all, please don't reproach yourself, your decision is being made with everyone's best interest at heart. Sending you hugs and thinking of you. Take care x

Offline AlanT

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Re: Resource aggression in puppies
« Reply #35 on: May 19, 2017, 06:08:48 PM »
All I did was tell you what I did and how it turned out.

I knew someone would moan.

But owners are different too.

I quite easily overcame this problem and have a dog that shares his favourite ball with a small child. They just pat it back and forward.

What's ridiculous about wearing gloves to handle a dog that's being difficult and you need to take something away?

Watch one of the videos on here, "Archie Finds a Ball",  see me working my dog.  Then tell me I'm ridiculous.

If you cannot see the bond of understanding I built, then I don't know what you expect from a pet dog.


Offline PennyB

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Re: Resource aggression in puppies
« Reply #36 on: May 20, 2017, 02:49:21 AM »


While resource gaurding is actually a normal behaviour in a pup/dog it isn't appropriate in the domestic environment.

Often you find at your pup's age is when they do push boundaries and I had similar issues with Ruby at this age. She would growl at me if I tried to get her off the sofa or anywere she was settled - after a chat with a dog trainer I began training specificially with this and doing practise sessions, mostly luring off the sofa with a treat using commands like off then only rewarding when her feet were all on the ground. After many attempts at this it worked.

Often its about teaching a dog before there is a problem rather than reacting to situations when they happen and to avoid confrontation at all costs (as that can escalate a problem that could easily be solved or managed - something I've seen in dogs that have come into the rescue). There are times when you have to ask is it worth getting back the item a dog has and in others if a dog is unhappy being around people when he is eating then let him have the space he needs. If something is of value to you (or a danger to the dog) then you need to go about teaching the pup to give the item up.

I appreciate many on here have different experiences of dog ownership but we need to ensure that the advice given should be about positive training/reinforcement  and remembering that while this forum is very useful we can't always see how the dog is in their home environment and so it may be best particularly when owners are struggling or if the owner feel their dog has problems with aggression they should be seeking good professional advice with someone who can see the dog for themselves

I can only add if you do decide to rehome as others suggest try to find a good rescue - either a breed one that is willing to work with your pup or even a good general dog rescue would suit as well
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Offline Jane S

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Re: Resource aggression in puppies
« Reply #37 on: May 20, 2017, 08:45:29 AM »
All I did was tell you what I did and how it turned out.

I knew someone would moan.

But owners are different too.

I quite easily overcame this problem and have a dog that shares his favourite ball with a small child. They just pat it back and forward.

What's ridiculous about wearing gloves to handle a dog that's being difficult and you need to take something away?

Watch one of the videos on here, "Archie Finds a Ball",  see me working my dog.  Then tell me I'm ridiculous.

If you cannot see the bond of understanding I built, then I don't know what you expect from a pet dog.

People are not moaning - they are just disagreeing with your approach. What worked for you may not work for anyone else as all dogs and all owners are different - wearing gloves to remove a guarded item and expecting to be bitten is quite confrontational and you will not find ANY modern trainers/behaviourists advising owners to do this. Yes you can post about what worked for you but you need to bear in mind that there will be many who do not share your views and they have a perfect right to say so too.
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Offline Archie bean

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Re: Resource aggression in puppies
« Reply #38 on: May 20, 2017, 12:00:49 PM »
Some great advice for you here. I totally agree that there is no such thing as giving up. You want to do what is best for your family and for your dog and it may well be that, in this case, that means letting your pup find a new home with a different dynamic. That is actually a very brave and difficult decision. I often wandered what would have become of Archie if he had been in a home with kids and other pets. I had many, many days where I considered re-homing him.

One thing I would say is that if you do decide to go down that route then be assured that a good rescue will assess him and find him a home that has experience with this issue and can give him the best chance. It is entirely possible that if you persevere things may improve. BUT - equally possible is that a mishap may occur and he may bite. This happened to me when I failed to respond to the warning signs Archie gave me. Entirely my fault. However, once a dog has bitten, my understanding is that it can be very difficult to find a rescue willing to give a second chance. Just something to bear in mind.

Whatever you decide will be the right decision for you and your family.
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Offline AlanT

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Re: Resource aggression in puppies
« Reply #39 on: May 20, 2017, 05:50:48 PM »
Goodbye girlies I just don't fit in here.

Offline phoenix

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Re: Resource aggression in puppies
« Reply #40 on: May 20, 2017, 09:20:36 PM »

I'm no 'girly' in age or attitude.  Most people expect to have a well balanced pup for a home with extended family  and other pets.  I've had a lot of dogs , before and after Bobby.   NONE Were like him. I was aware that this tendency occurred , and was aghast when my puppy announced himself as a resource guarder.  Our children had moved on, so I joined Col, otherwise I would have cracked up. As you have wondered, he did dominate our lives, and it was a difficult period to beg other family members to adopt the proper methods with him.  To be brutally honest, if I had young children to care for, I might have returned him to his breeder or to rehoming.  He had no problems with other dogs. Just guarding anything left on the floor etc,  hand shyness,  possessiveness of the car if he was put in first,  and so on.  Being a lion tamer would have escalated the situation, with devastating consequences for the dog.
I was broken-hearted with him many a time, and I know how you feel.  99% of the time they are perfect. If he's going to break up your happy home,  be strong, and speak to the organisations already mentioned.  There may be people like me who understand him and know how to cope.   As mentioned, our member TopBarks,  has much experience as a cocker owner and trainer, to share and advise.
RIP Marti  the EPI springer age 12,  and beloved black cocker Bobby, 8 yrs old, too soon, from PLN.
Now owned by TInker, tiny hairy grey poodle/terrier rescue from Greece and Jack, local rescue,   scruffy ginger terrier mutt.