Author Topic: When to spay  (Read 248 times)

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Offline SandyT

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When to spay
« on: August 09, 2017, 01:05:21 PM »
I'm sure this topic has come up many times but I wanted to ask for advice.  Our cocker will be 7 months old next week.   We are taking her on a camping holiday (in a caravan - not wild) at the end of the month.  We currently have a spaying for her scheduled next week allowing two weeks for her to recover before our trip.

I've been reading different opinions lately saying it's better to wait till after their first season, though our vet says she's ready now.  I don't believe she's had her first season yet, at least I haven't noticed anything.

If I put off spaying for a little while, how problematic would it be if she goes into heat while we are camping?  She will be on a lead the whole time but we will likely be around many other dogs. 

Also, I've read spaying and neutering affects their soft coats, is that true? 

Offline Guelder Rose

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Re: When to spay
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2017, 01:46:10 PM »
I opted to wait until Grace had two seasons before having her spayed.

There are so many different opinions on this, that in the end I think you have to decide what feels right for you.

I wanted Grace to be fully matured first, which is why I opted for after her second season; and I had also read that early spaying was linked to continence problems. 

During her two seasons I didn't experience any problems with other dogs trying to get to her or vice versa.

As for her coat, it changed a bit, but not anywhere near as much as my last Cocker who was a rescue and had been spayed early.  I had to clip Rosie quite short as she was so woolly, but Grace still has length to her coat and it's really only the black fur that curls up. 




Offline rubybella

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Re: When to spay
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2017, 02:47:58 PM »
I personally believe that you should let them have at least one season and it is best to allow their bones and joints to develop fully otherwise they can end up with problems. I have seen a spaniel with deformed legs which the specialist said had been caused by early spaying and the fact that bones had stopped growing. And yes, their coat does change !

Offline Carolynleah

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Re: When to spay
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2017, 03:58:39 PM »
Nerys had two seasons before being spayed, and her coat has definitely become woolier.

Offline its.sme

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Re: When to spay
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2017, 06:04:35 PM »
Bea had two Seasons, she was and still is a small Cocker and so I wanted to give her the extra time to mature.

I opted for a Key Hole spay which is more expensive but in my opinion so worth the extra money, the recovery time was so much quicker as there was not one long incision but 3 small ones.

Bea is clipped on top but with full feathering, her legs are the worst as they are very Woolley.

It is a personal choice but I would happily do the same again.

Sharon.

Offline SandyT

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Re: When to spay
« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2017, 06:27:50 PM »
Thank you everyone, the more I think about it the more inclined I am to wait a little longer.  I don't want to bring more puppies into the world but there aren't any other dogs around so it should be fine.  I hate the idea of her coat changing though, she's so soft now I love snuggling her.  I don't want that to change :(
One thing the vet pointed out to say she was ready for spaying was the fact all her milk teeth are gone and she has a full set of adult teeth.  Is that a typical thing to judge their readiness?

Offline Gazrob

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Re: When to spay
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2017, 11:29:57 PM »
I have a male dog. I'm not planning on nuetering him at all unless there is a medical reason to do so. The chances of him getting testicular cancer is slim. I don't let him run around the streets. I'm always supervising him when outside. I've seen no change in his behaviour. He's not that interested in other dogs sexually. He's got a lovely coat that hasn't changed at all since I got him. He's nice and slim no weight issues no temperament issues.

Offline Gazrob

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Re: When to spay
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2017, 11:35:17 PM »
My dog is bigger than a lot of cockers I've seen. He's slim and muscular. I think that's because they had their dogs nuetered at an early age. I see one often he's only 6 he's got arthritis and he's overweight he's half the size of my Marley.

Offline elaine.e

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Re: When to spay
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2017, 03:16:05 PM »
My dog is bigger than a lot of cockers I've seen. He's slim and muscular. I think that's because they had their dogs nuetered at an early age. I see one often he's only 6 he's got arthritis and he's overweight he's half the size of my Marley.

Like you I leave my male dogs intact unless there's a medical reason to have them castrated, but want to point out that dogs and bitches that are neutered before their growth plates close often grow taller than those left entire. The reason is that growth plate closure is governed by hormones and early neutering before puberty disrupts and slows down the process. The lack of hormones can also affect bone density. So dogs that are neutered young will often be taller but have less dense bone.

Elaine, William and Louis xxx

Offline lescef

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Re: When to spay
« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2017, 05:36:53 PM »
I've never heard of the link between teeth and spaying. Our second cocker had what you might call a 'silent season'. The vet said she'd had one but there had never been any sign.
If I ever have another female dog I would wait until after a second season rather than just having one, especially if they have their first season quite young. (Maddie was fifteen months but Bramble was nine months)
Sadly their coat does change. It's  one disadvantage of spaying. They can also put on weight.
Lesley, Maddie and Bramble

Offline SandyT

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Re: When to spay
« Reply #10 on: August 10, 2017, 11:15:36 PM »
Well I called and postponed the spaying appointment which was scheduled next week, I have it rescheduled another month from now but I may wait past that.  She is at 7 months old this month.  Is it pretty obvious when they go into season?

Someone mentioned doing a partial spay to me, where they don't take out the ovaries (at least that was my understanding).  Has anyone else here done that? 

It really bothers me to think we will change her lovely coat by spaying, but maybe I'm being selfish thinking that way.   There are probably more benefits than negatives by spaying.   It's so hard to know what to do,  I'm glad for now though that I Cancelled next week's appointment.

Offline Gazrob

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Re: When to spay
« Reply #11 on: August 10, 2017, 11:48:12 PM »
It's your decision. If I were you I'd do a bit more research before you go ahead. You don't want to regret your decision down the road. Weigh up the pros and cons. What are the chances of her getting pregnant accidentally? I have a male dog so it was an easier decision for me. If I was going to do it which I'm not I was advised to wait till he was at least a year and a half old so his bones and joints have time to grow properly. I don't feel that he needs neutering. He's no bother. Im just going to let nature take its course. My family tried pushing me into getting him fixed they say it will calm him down.hes just a year old and he's a cocker spaniel that's the way they are. He's just playful and full of energy. It's his personality. I don't want to change that.

Offline Carolynleah

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Re: When to spay
« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2017, 10:43:27 AM »
As I have an entire male Labrador, any female dog I have will have to be spayed - I know some people manage entire males and unspayed females together but I don't think I could be sure of keeping them apart.
One point - I thought vets liked to spay females about 3 months after a season, when the blood supply to the womb was less? If your dog hasn't had a season yet, how would the vet know she wasn't just about to come into season?

Offline lescef

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Re: When to spay
« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2017, 12:03:37 PM »
Yes, spaying is usually done three months after a season.
With our other three diogs it was obvious that they were in season -swollen area and bleeding. They are sometimes more clingy and generally unhappy. 
Lesley, Maddie and Bramble