Author Topic: Walking on a lead  (Read 2299 times)

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Offline HBP

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Re: Walking on a lead
« Reply #30 on: October 13, 2013, 10:07:57 AM »
Im not really a beliver in walking to heel after watching victoria stillwell. She made me ask myself about the reasons why and couldnt find any lol xx
Does she suggest it's not necessary? It is in many situations, especially where dogs are working.  It's also a 'physics' thing (particularly with a large dog).  A dog at the end of even a normal length lead is much harder to control if it lunges in any direction than if it were beside the handler on a shorter lead. I don't ask for obedience style heelwork from my dogs, but when on lead they are kept close.

In "Its me or the dog" book, she writes that dogs are better walking in front as "they have 4 legs, so naturally walk faster". Which is all well and good when they know how to behave on a lead, but I find it difficult with a puppy. I'm teaching heel as a way to control initially but it's not like I expect him to walk everywhere like this!!

Offline woollypigs

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Re: Walking on a lead
« Reply #31 on: October 13, 2013, 10:16:46 AM »
what is a Halti please, someone mentioned it but no one commented. thanks
We've been looking into these for our Tilley (not a spaniel, but a puller!). The most popular Halti is a headcollar which fits around the dog's muzzle and provides control for the head, not just the body. Our trainer has recommended we use one in conjunction with a harness, as using a headcollar alone on a pup that pulls could seriously damage its neck. We're going to try one soon with a training lead attached to the headcollar and other end of the training lead attached to her normal harness. This supposedly helps to 'balance' the dog when walking, and gives some control of the head as well as the body.

Halti also make a harness which has a front-fastening loop for the lead, rather than rear-fastening. We tried one on Tilley but couldn't get even the smallest size to fit properly: the lead simply pulled the entire harness around to the side. 

Our harness of choice at the moment is the Ancol Happy at Heel. It has a unique (as far as we know) side fastening, which brings the lead across the front of the dog's chest and therefore when it pulls, the harness 'guides' it around to face you. It provides by far the most control against Tilley pulling of all the harnesses we've tried so far, and makes it easier to train her, as she is automatically brought around to face us. However, it is not padded and we're keeping a careful eye in case it ends up chafing her and causing discomfort.
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Offline woollypigs

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Re: Walking on a lead
« Reply #32 on: October 13, 2013, 10:17:16 AM »
Edit to add: Tilley is eight months, a pretty strong Collie cross, hence the need to save our backs and get a bit of control!
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Offline Emilyoliver

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Re: Walking on a lead
« Reply #33 on: October 13, 2013, 10:17:23 AM »
Im not really a beliver in walking to heel after watching victoria stillwell. She made me ask myself about the reasons why and couldnt find any lol xx
Does she suggest it's not necessary? It is in many situations, especially where dogs are working.  It's also a 'physics' thing (particularly with a large dog).  A dog at the end of even a normal length lead is much harder to control if it lunges in any direction than if it were beside the handler on a shorter lead. I don't ask for obedience style heelwork from my dogs, but when on lead they are kept close.

In "Its me or the dog" book, she writes that dogs are better walking in front as "they have 4 legs, so naturally walk faster". Which is all well and good when they know how to behave on a lead, but I find it difficult with a puppy. I'm teaching heel as a way to control initially but it's not like I expect him to walk everywhere like this!!
Interesting...  depends on how fast the owner walks (or breed of dog)? Don't see either why a dog (or horse for that matter) shouldn't be taught to adjust its speed/stride to the owner's requirements?  But haven't got the book so probably shouldn't be commenting  :005:
Agree with you, though - control is definitely needed initially.  I have 3 dogs - if I allowed them to dictate the pace I'd spend a lot of time sprawled on the pavement  :005:
Michelle, Emily and Ollie

Offline Sharpie

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Re: Walking on a lead
« Reply #34 on: October 13, 2013, 10:26:22 AM »
I have used a "lupi" harness (5 ish off ebay) for Daisy to get her used to walking slowly. It has worked a treat in getting her to slow down. It goes around the chest and just doesnt allow pulling. I have then clicked and treated as we have gone along.

She's now pretty good at walking on a lead around town etc...I keep telling her "that's nice Daisy" and give her a treat, and she continues along very nicely.

I also ask her to sit before she crosses the road.

 I don't use the lupi any more now..it was a short term thing.

.......Although she does still pull my arm out of it's socket sometimes at the start of a walk :016:  >:(

Offline lindsmat

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Re: Walking on a lead
« Reply #35 on: October 13, 2013, 06:55:07 PM »
ok, so ive had some great response and advice on the  thread i started, everyone obviously has there own way of how to teach there dog not to pull. now some more advice needed. People with adult cockers have been constantly telling me that as i have a cocker i will sooner or later end up buying a halti, or something called a gencon, which i presume is nearly the same. Now brandy is only nearly 6 months old. she is not a large 6 months, so i dont really like the thought of her having one of them halti round her nose, thats why i am persisting on the reverse walking option. am i wrong? are halti's right for puppys of 6 months, giving that of course she is only a small cocker.

Offline Macette

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Re: Walking on a lead
« Reply #36 on: October 14, 2013, 07:05:01 PM »
I put a Halti on Lexi at about 9 months I think...she is a small cocker and size 1 was a bit big she was able to get it into her mouth..I got the smallest size 0 and it fits very neatly she is able to open her mouth to pant but not to loose bit like a horses bridle .Within a few minutes of her having it on she was walking like an angel. They really can not pull with their nose. Our walks were an absolute nightmare and now they are a pleasure. She sits to get e Halti on and it does not bother her at all. I am still waiting for her to grow into the size 1. It really is the best thing I have ever bought. We have had two or 3 harnesses and they were a waste of money. Worth a try the pet shop will let you try it out.



Offline abzy0309

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Re: Walking on a lead
« Reply #37 on: October 15, 2013, 07:41:53 AM »
So glad I started this discussion  :D

Thanks for all the useful information everyone, Reggie's walking is getting better and you've given me lots of advice as to not just give in and have a steam train pulling me everywhere!


Abbie & Reggie